Ameer Makhoul’s Trial

…is a farce. Here’s why (I submitted this to electronic intifada and I think they like exclusivity, but I wanted to post it here, too):

We arrive at the Haifa Courts building around 11, a half hour after proceedings began. It was supposed to begin at 9:00 but was pushed back. The room – even though there is a horde of people outside waiting to get in – has only two benches for spectators. There are empty courtrooms with five or six benches, enough to easily accommodate all interested parties.

But instead we’re outside the door, while two, sometimes three, behemoth security guards control the door and glare at us intimidatingly. Milling around is a veritable who’s who of Haifa politics and activism. A Jewish member of the Communist party who is on city council comes out after giving testimony and hobnobs with influential activists, former Members of Knesset, employees of various NGOs in Haifa, international activists, journalists, powerful lawyers, and friends and family of Ameer. It’s a bit unnerving to realize that if they wanted, the Shabak could show up outside this courtroom, arrest everyone standing there, and essentially silence all dissent in Haifa. All the major players in one place, for one cause.

As two people come out, two are let in. One comes out, one goes in. Then two come out, and the ogres at the door decide no one else is allowed in. Some among us start arguing with them, calling them out on their arbitrary change of policy, but they’re enjoying their show of strength too much. They tell us to move over; we have to wait from the side, for no apparent reason. They bring in those extendable line-makers, you know, like in movie theaters and airports, and create a space where they can stand with their arms crossed, surveying their prey, a space we’re not allowed to enter. It’s a power trip, and these goons are getting off on their über-masculine superiority. It’s sad, sort of; in another life, in another place, these guys would be basketball players or construction workers or insurance salesmen. But they wouldn’t be the hired thugs put in place to blatantly exploit the power disparity between those of us who just want in and those who control our every move. There is an easy parallel between this charade and the political situation here; we are told where we can stand, what we can do, and whether or not we are allowed in.

And just like that, it’s over. People come flooding out; greeting and kissing each other on the cheek, saying hello to friends and family and colleagues. Ameer’s wife and daughters come out into the crowd, so do his sisters and his brother, observers from European embassies, community members, then the lawyers. A line-up of some of the best lawyers in Israel were in there, and still, this trial continues. It’s court date after court date of unanimously supportive character witness testimony. The prosecution has no evidence to present, at least not in a public hearing; such is the nature of these “security cases.” There was supposed to be a decision on his sentence today, but there wasn’t, and there will be yet another court date in January with more and more character witnesses, more and more people testifying in support of Ameer Makhoul. But there is irony in this; the longer they can postpone sentencing him, the longer he stays in jail, unable to kiss his wife, or hug his daughters. We can spend years and years giving positive testimony in support of Ameer but if he is not sentenced, he stays in jail, perpetually on trial.

When his younger daughter came out of the courtroom, I read her eyes. She is brave, so brave. I cannot imagine going through what she is. Month after month she comes to these trials, sees the community supporting her father, perhaps once in a blue moon she can hold his hand. His sister was allowed to hug and kiss him for the first time today, but when his wife visits him in prison they are permitted only to communicate through a telephone and a glass barrier. He is perpetually sealed off from his family. His daughter floats through the crowd, puts on a smile, hugs her aunts and uncles, and shakes hands with her father’s colleagues. When they look away, her face falls, and her eyes are sad, almost empty, resigned in a way to his fate. She has gone through too much for a girl her age. Still she, and his entire family, and the entire community, tirelessly fight for his rights. But with each farcical trial date, perpetuating this charade of “justice,” it seems less and less likely that these rights will ever be realized, a decision will be made, and he will be released, able to join his family at their home once again.

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One thought on “Ameer Makhoul’s Trial

  1. I think what you’re discovering is nothing to do with Judaism/Jewishness/Jews but everything to do with growing up in the US. It seems to be contained in a song Neil Young never wrote: it takes a broken heart to love with.

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