Guns, Sex, and Social Stories

There’s always time for a quick revelation.

Like when after reading way too many takes and post-takes and post-post-takes on the Aziz Ansari incident (I won’t even bother linking), you finally read one that reminds of you of something totally not related and yet totally exactly the same that you’re like, holy shit, this is a sociological pattern if there ever was one.

I’ll quote directly, because that’s how I roll. I will also add the caveat that I actually have not read the entire article because this connection is too obvious to let a commentary go even five minutes stewed.

The Aziz Ansari case hit a nerve because, as I’ve long feared, we’re only comfortable with movements like #MeToo so long as the men in question are absolute monsters we can easily separate from the pack. Once we move past the “few bad apples” argument and start to suspect that this is more a trend than a blip, our instinct is to normalize. To insist that this is is just how men are, and how sex is. (Lili Loofbourow in The Week)

Let me repeat for effect: “… so long as the men in question are absolute monsters we can easily separate from the pack … [once we] suspect that this is more a trend than a blip, our instinct is to normalize.”

What does this pattern — the pattern of separating monsters but normalizing systemic violence — remind you of?

Anyone?

Anyone?

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Cross-posting: bit.ly and the new age of #revolution

Important internet fact #1: When the end of a URL is .il, .uk, .us, .jp, etc., that tells you the country in which that URL is registered.

“As it turns out, the “.ly” suffix is a top-level domain that’s under the control of the Libyan government, in the same way that “.uk” and “.jp” domains are controlled by the U.K. and Japan, respectively….Because the Libyan regime retains ultimate control over the domain, it can unilaterally decide which sites or services can use it. “

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